Shirley A. from the NSW Shirley Club penned this immortal song, which rated in the TOP 10 of Macca's Best Songs!
Macca is heard on ABC Radio and Shortwave every Sunday morning.

Scroll down for some more fun information, which is interesting and entertaining.



What's in a name you say. What's in a name?
We all have our own -- that's part of the game.
To know who is who, so we remember them well.
Though some are the same - so what's in a name?
There's Amy and Brian and Cathleen and Ted.
David and Hazel and Stephen and Bev.
But think of one all and I'm sure you'll agree --
The best name of all is of course -- SHIRLEY!

What's in a name you say. What's in a name?
We all have our own -- that's part of the game.
To know who is who, so we remember them well.
Though some are the same - so what's in a name?
There's Shirley and Shirley and Shirley and Shirl.
So think of one specian and I'm sure you'll agree
The best name of all is of course -- SHIRLEY!


For your added pleasure, I've transcribed the history, amending grammatical mistakes to make more sense of the passage.

A detailed history of England commenced from the Germanic invasions during the mid 5th century AD. During the 10th century, Britain was united into one Kingdom with all existing Anglo-Saxon communities merging after the invasion in 1066 of William of Normandy who later became William I of England. The Normans brought with them the feudal system which was a social system of rights and duties based on land tenure.

The English surname Shirley is of local origin. Local surnames were derived from the place where a person once lived, or a prominent local geographical feature. Perhaps a hill identified one person from another who lived near a bridge, river, lake, etc. Many of these names were preceded by a preposition such as “de”, “at”, “by” or “in”. These tended to lapse in later years. In this case the name means "of Shirley". There are a number of places of this name located in the counties Derbyshire, Hampshire and Surrey and the West Midlands. The place name itself is derived from the Old English words "scir" meaing bright and "leah" which means wood clearing.

It is often assumed that surnames were adopted by the user, when in fact few were, as no need existed for the individual to distinguish himself from his peers. Names were used mainly to assist in the ready identification of a person for the purposes of tax payment, church records, transfer of land, military service and any official documentation.

The earliest recorded references to the surname "Shirley" or a variant appear to be found in the English documents from at least the 13th century when William de Schirle was mentioned in the Assize Rolls of Yorkshire in 1219 AD. A century later, Ralph de Shirleye was recorded in the Feet of Fines of Warwickshire in 1318. Later in the century, Johannes de Scherlay and Willelmus de Scherlay were listed in the Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379. More recently, records show that George Schyrlye of Leicestershire was enrolled as a student of the University of Oxford in 1573, as was John Shirley of Sussex in 1582.

Below, you can see that there is some contention about what the Shirley coat of arms looks like, but the basic elements (Saracen's head and banner) are to be seen in each representation.

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[Permission to reproduce this article has been received -- thank you David Fagan (editor Courier Mail) and the artist, Mark Wharton.]

Trent Dalton penned a highly amusing article in the Courier Mail on the last day of 2008.

He was becoming despondent with his inability to join a number of prestigious clubs via the Web. Or was it that the entrance exams were forbidding?

Anyway, it was our Shirley Club which finally won him over. Fun, Food and Friendship beckoned. I've reproduced the last few paragraphs of the article -- the bits which will be of most interest to the Shirleys.

If you are reading this, Trent, you're welcome to come along to any of our Brisbane Butterflies get-togethers, where we'll furnish you with a "Shirley-for-a-Day" badge. The grape-stomping at Canungra? What about a Saturday on the punt at Doomben?

Or do you fancy campfire singing (hits from the 50's, 60's and 70's)?


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